• Apple will repair busted keyboards on recent MacBooks and MacBook Pros for free

    Back in 2016, Apple redesigned the MacBook Pro’s keyboard. It… hasn’t gone as well as they probably hoped. Complaints of failing keys quickly started popping up. Some keys had a tendency to get stuck in place; others move freely, but simply don’t respond. Two years and a lawsuit later, Apple is officially acknowledging the issue with a free keyboard repair program. And if you already paid Apple to fix your keyboard? Give them a call. According to this support page, they’re planning on refunding previous repair charges. Apple says the following models are eligible: MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, Early 2015) MacBook (Retina, 12­-inch, Early 2016) MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, 2017) MacBook Pro (13­-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports) MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports) MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports) MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports) MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2016) MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2017) To get the process started, you’ll have to take your affected laptop into an authorized service provider or an Apple retail store, or mail the whole thing in. They’ll examine it to make sure that it’s actually the keyboard’s fault (read: to make sure you didn’t spill a cup of juice on it or something), then either replace the affected key or swap out the whole board. Alas, this repair isn’t often a quick one (they have to take just about everything else out of the computer first) — so expect to be without your laptop for a few days. And before you panic that your warranty is about to expire: Apple says these keyboard repairs will be covered from four years after your original purchase date, regardless of warranty status. With design issues like this I’d hope for something a bit longer than that, but it’s a start.

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  • Bitcoin Price Watch: Is the Recent Drop Part of a Bigger Picture?

    At press time, bitcoin is retaining its $6,100 price from yesterday. The currency fell to this position from $6,700 after Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) sent notifications to more than five digital currency exchanges saying that they must heighten their security measures against money laundering after noticing weaknesses in their infrastructures. Bitcoin has continued to suffer drops over the past week. Its initial slump to $6,700 occurred after hovering at the $7,600 mark for some time, and now the price is just $100 away from its February low. While bitcoin did drop below $6,000 during yesterday’s evening hours, things didn’t last, and the coin quickly pushed itself back up to $6,100, where it has been ever since. Bitcoin has allegedly lost over 70 percent of its value since December, when it managed to strike near the $20,000 range. However, many analysts are unconcerned about the currency’s recent behavior, saying it’s all part of a downward trend that was predicted long ago. Digital currency investor Marius Rupsys, for example, has consistently mentioned this idea, stating that while bitcoin pushes steadily lower, the question remains regarding when “big investors will come back.” “Retail traders might be actively buying and selling, but their volumes aren’t sufficient to move the market significantly to either side,” he comments. “’Wait and see’ is for larger investors, who try to get into crypto assets using OTC.” He added: “The volume is going down consistently on all major exchanges (i.e. Bitfinex), so this sell pressure is reducing as less and less people are willing to sell. I am waiting for volume to pick up, which is likely to push the price upwards given sellers sold and new investors want to get in, though it is very difficult to know when that will happen. Therefore, my position is to wait for price action with volume.” Other analysts, however, aren’t so sure, and predict a case of the old gloom-and-doom for bitcoin should the currency fall any lower. Publisher of the newsletter Crypto Patterns Jon Pearlstone, for example, states: “If bitcoin breaks the 2018 lows, watch for a spike in volume and a possible fast drop in price towards the $5,000 level.” Bitcoin is not alone in its demise. The currency is joined by entities like Litecoin – which has struck its lowest point in roughly seven months – and ether, which is currently trading at $479 – about 60 percent lower than its all-time high last December. Overall, the cryptocurrency market has crashed, falling to about $259 billion at press time from $813 billion (almost $1 trillion) last year. Figures like Phillip Nunn – CEO of the Manchester-based financial firm Blackmore Group – are sticking to their guns that bitcoin will reach new heights by the end of the year. Nunn is certain that bitcoin will strike $60,000 by the time 2018 closes, and despite the massive drops, we can’t help but consider bitcoin’s behavior last year, when it rose from $5,000 to nearly $20,000 in just one month between November and December. Could the currency do something extraordinary like that again before things tumble further? Nothing’s impossible, we suppose…. Bitcoin Charts by TradingView

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