Home / Explore Technology / Phones / Americans Can’t Put Down Their Phones, Shut Off the TV

Americans Can’t Put Down Their Phones, Shut Off the TV

Have a hard time prying your eyes from a screen? You're not alone.

A new report from market research firm eMarketer reveals that US adults are now spending more than half their day—12 hours and 7 minutes, on average—consuming media. That includes nearly six hours with digital media on a mobile device, desktop, laptop, or tablet and four hours in front of the TV; nearly 1.5 hours with radio; and 25 minutes with print media sources.

EMarketer likened American's media obsession to the annual Coney Island hot dog eating contest.

"It has seemed in recent years that US adults bring a similar spirit to their consumption of media, cramming as much as possible into an average day," the firm wrote. "Like a Coney Island contestant stuffing hot dogs into his mouth with both hands, people are often using multiple media at the same time. That is how the figure for time spent can add up to 12 hours a day."

Related

The company said it counted simultaneous usage separately, so if someone spent an hour in front of the TV, and browsed the web on their smartphone at the same time, that counted for an hour of usage for each.

One might surmise that our collective smartphone obsession would start to dwindle by now. Not so, according to eMarketer; the average time we're spending with smartphones has "steadily increased," it said. EMarketer expects the amount of "nonvoice" time we spend with smartphones to rise from two hours, 18 minutes in 2014 to two hours, 42 minutes by 2019.

"The proliferation of apps is clearly a factor in this increase," the company wrote. "For users of smartphones — and, to a slightly lesser extent, users of tablets—time spent using those devices mostly means time spent using apps."

Read more

Check Also

The Huawei P20 is not coming to the U.S.

Meet the Huawei P20. It’s a pretty nice phone. I played around with it, and I can confirm that it is, indeed, a solid flagship with some suitably over-the-top features — what’s that you say? Three rear-facing cameras?! But all of this is kind of a moot point if you live here in the States. Sure, Huawei’s been having a lot of issues trying to sell its phones in America. In fact, just as I was playing around with the P20, news was breaking that Best Buy was planning to stop selling the company’s phones — it was a bit like finding out your starting pitcher needs Tommy John surgery before opening day. Only with, you know, lots more international espionage and such. Rather than deal with the rigmarole of getting shot down by carriers and retailers this time out, the company is simply making it clear right off the bat that the new flagship just won’t be available here — not through any sort of official channels. And honestly, it’s probably best for Huawei to just focus on those countries that have long stocked its phones — from the look of the FCC reports earlier this week, this situation is going to get worse long before it gets any better. For the rest of the world, there’s plenty to like here. The P20 looks like a cross between the iPhone X and HTC’s latest shiny metal phones. It’s got a 5.8-inch display (6.1 on the P20 Pro) and some crazy camera specs, including three rear lenses, including an eight-megapixel telephoto and 40-megapixel (!) RGP, coupled with a built-in color temperature sensor. There’s still a front-mounted fingerprint sensor and some strange choices, like a 2D face unlock function that makes do with the lack of depth sensing. No pricing or availability at press time, except here in the States, where the latter is just a picture of a big red circle with a line through it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Disclaimer: Trading in bitcoins or other digital currencies carries a high level of risk and can result in the total loss of the invested capital. theonlinetech.org does not provide investment advice, but only reflects its own opinion. Please ensure that if you trade or invest in bitcoins or other digital currencies (for example, investing in cloud mining services) you fully understand the risks involved! Please also note that some external links are affiliate links.