Home / Explore Technology / Phones / ‘Nintendo Check-In’ Trademark Filed

‘Nintendo Check-In’ Trademark Filed

Nintendo was initially quite slow to adopt an online presence compared to its main rivals Sony and Microsoft. But more recently, Nintendo stared getting more adventurous and even jumped into the mobile app space using key IP including Mario and Pokemon. Now it looks as though Nintendo is going to introduce some kind of location-based rewards system for Switch and smartphone gamers.

As Nintendo Wire reports, Nintendo filed a new trademark in Japan for the term "Nintendo Check-In." The trademark also included an image, which shows Mario's cap inside the well-known map location icon. The trademark filing by Nintendo was confirmed in a tweet by @trademark_bot.

You may remember that back in March 2016 Nintendo introduced a new Nintendo Account aimed at non-Nintendo devices and was later used for the Nintendo Switch to register up to eight users on a single Switch. It seems very likely that Nintendo Check-In will be linked to the Nintendo Account as it includes all portable devices that could take advantage of it. There could also be support for the 3DS especially as Nintendo would like to sell a lot of the new 2DS XL next year.


As to what Nintendo Check-In is specifically, the use of the map icon suggests it's a system of "friendly" tracking of your location. So if you're using your Switch away from home, or playing with Nintendo apps on your smartphone, Nintendo Check-In could be active to track and reward you. There's also the potential for it to reward visiting specific locations, for example, Nintendo could have an event in your city and attending it will result in some digital goodies being added to your account.

Nintendo intends to launch its $20 online service subscription in 2018. With the trademark for Check-In only just being filed, I wouldn't be surprised to see it officially launch alongside the subscription service next year. Until that happens, Nintendo will keep us guessing as to what features and rewards Check-In will offer.

Read more

Check Also

Get the latest TC stories read to you over the phone with BrailleVoice

For the visually impaired, there are lots of accessibility options if you want to browse the web — screen readers, podcast versions of articles and so on. But it can still be a pain to keep up with your favorite publications the way sighted app users do. BrailleVoice is a project that puts the news in a touch-tone phone interface, reading you the latest news from your favorite publications (like this one) easily from anywhere you get a signal. It’s from SpaceNext, AKA Shan, who has a variety of useful little apps he’s developed over the years on his page — John wrote up one back in 2011. Several of them have an accessibility aspect to them, something that always piques my interest. “Visually challenged users will find it difficult to navigate using apps,” he wrote in an email. “I thought with text to speech readily available… they would be able to make a call to a toll free number to listen to latest news from any site.” All you do is dial 1-888-666-4013, then listen to the options on the menu. TechCrunch is the first outlet listed, so hit 1# and it’ll read out the headlines. Select one (of mine) and it’ll jump right in. That’s it! There are a couple of dozen sites listed right now, from LifeHacker (hit 15#) to the Times of India (hit 26#). You can also suggest new sites to add, presumably as long as they have some kind of RSS feed. (This should be a reminder why you should keep your website or news service accessible in some like manner.) “More importantly,” he continued, “this works even without internet even in the remotest of places. You can listen to your favorite news site without having to spend a dime or worry about internet.” Assuming you can get a voice signal and you’ve got minutes, anyway. I quite like the idea of someone walking into the nearest town, pulling out their old Nokia, dialing this up and keeping up to date with the most news-addicted of us. The text to speech engine is pretty rudimentary, but it’s better than what we all had a few years back, and it’ll only get better as improved engines like Google’s and Apple’s trickle down for general purpose use. I’m going to ask them about that, actually. It’s quite a basic service, but what more does it need to have, really? Shan is planning to integrate voice controls into the likes of Google Home and Alexa, so there’s that. But as is it may be enough to provide plenty of utility to the vision-impaired. Check out TextOnly too. I could use that for desktop.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Disclaimer: Trading in bitcoins or other digital currencies carries a high level of risk and can result in the total loss of the invested capital. theonlinetech.org does not provide investment advice, but only reflects its own opinion. Please ensure that if you trade or invest in bitcoins or other digital currencies (for example, investing in cloud mining services) you fully understand the risks involved! Please also note that some external links are affiliate links.