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Apple Back-to-School Deals Include Free Beats Gear

If you need a new Mac computer or iPad for school this fall, now is a good time to buy.

Apple just announced its 2017 back-to-school promotion, which runs now through September 25 in the US. Apple is offering free Beats Solo3 wireless on-ear headphones, which normally cost $299.95, when you buy an eligible Mac. Qualifying machines include the iMac, Mac Pro, MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air, including configure-to-order versions.

If you don't want the Solo3, you can get a free pair of Powerbeats3 wireless earphones (normally $199.95) or Solo3 headphones (normally $149.95) instead.

Meanwhile, those in the market for a new iPad Pro can get a pair of BeatsX earphones, normally priced at $149.95, for free. If you're not into those, you can instead get a set of Powerbeats3 or Solo3 for $149.95 off. So, you'll end up paying $50 for the Powerbeats 3 or $150 for the Solo3.

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Keep in mind that these deals are only available when you purchase new products, so refurbished models are not eligible for the offer.

These back-to-school deals are available at Apple retail stores, Cupertino's Online Store for Education, authorized campus stores, and via 1-800-MY-APPLE. The deals are only open to students, parents purchasing on behalf of their child who is attending or has been accepted to college, faculty members of K-12 and higher education institutions, and homeschool teachers. Check out Apple's full terms and conditions for more info about the promotion.

Meanwhile, students can also get Apple Music for just $4.99 a month, down from $9.99.

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