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Watch the Long-Awaited US vs. Japan Robot Battle

Two years ago, the world was promised a giant robot duel pitting the US against Japan. Next week, we'll finally get to watch the "super heavyweight title fight."

In case you forgot, US-based MegaBots, Inc. challenged Japan's Suidobashi Heavy Industries to a robot duel in 2015, and Suidobashi accepted — with one caveat: that it be melee combat. MegaBots was up for the challenge, but needed to upgrade its Mk.II robot before putting it against Suidobashi's Kuratas machine for some hand-to-hand action.

After crowdfunding more than $500,000 on Kickstarter to update its machine, MegaBots last month finally unveiled its official entrant to the giant robot duel: Eagle Prime. The $2.5 million robot, which seats two, weighs in at 12 tons, stands 16 feet tall, and is powered by a 430 horsepower V8 LS3 engine. Check it out in the video below.

Suidobashi's Kuratas, the "only other known giant piloted robot in the world," according to MegaBots, weighs in at 6.5 tons and stands 13 feet tall.

Both robots were piloted from the inside by the founders of both companies: Kogoro Kurata of Suidobashi and Matt Oehrlein and Gui Cavalcanti of MegaBots.

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The duel, which has already taken place, is set to air on the MegaBots Twitch channel on Tuesday, Oct. 17, at 7 p.m. PST. Immediately after it airs, the battle will be posted to Facebook and YouTube.

"Get ready to witness the most incredible sports entertainment that the world has ever seen: Nation-on-nation robot combat. Multi-ton behemoths will swing punches, tearing steel armor panels off each other until one mech is left standing, while the opponent is left a heap of scrap metal," MegaBots wrote on its website. "Welcome to the future of sports."

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