The Morning After: Notch alternatives are getting interesting

Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. Netflix kept the pressure on this weekend with some new trailers -- don't miss the Stranger Things season three episode titles -- and the all-screen phone trend could go in a couple of new directions with Honor...

Netflix’s ‘A Series Of Unfortunate Events’ returns March 30th

Fans of Netflix's take on Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, rejoice: The show's second season will be available on March 30th. The streaming service dropped a trailer teasing the next batch of episodes fronted by Neil Patrick Harris' m...

Would You Like to Talk to Your Fridge? LG Can Help

LG's new ThinQ platform enables device interaction and habit recognition for smart home appliances and electronics.

Microsoft shows off Windows PCs that run on Qualcomm chips

Intel’s stumbles in the mobile arena grew to become Qualcomm’s gains with its Snapdragon platform, but now it appears that Qualcomm intends to upend their dominance in entry-level PCs as well. Today, Microsoft and Qualcomm announced that Windows would begin running on systems powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon mobile chipsets. This isn’t entirely earth-shattering given… Read More

Level’s activity-tracking smart glasses launches this March

Even though Intel unveiled its Vaunt smart glasses earlier this month, insurance provider VSP has actually been working on its own take on smart eyewear for well over a year now. It's called Level, and while it won't offer head's up notifications lik...

Microsoft closes its $7.5B purchase of code-sharing platform GitHub

After getting EU approval a week ago, today Microsoft’s acquisition of GitHub, the Git-based code sharing and collaboration service with 31 million developers, has officially closed. The Redmond, WA-based software behemoth first said it would acquire GitHub for $7.5 billion in stock in June of this year, and after the acquisition closed it would continue to run it as an independent platform and business. The acquisition is yet another sign of how Microsoft has been doubling down on courting developers and presenting itself as a neutral partner to help them with their projects. That is because, despite its own very profitable proprietary software business, Microsoft also has a number of other businesses — for example, Azure, which competes with AWS and Google Cloud — that rely heavily on it being unbiased towards one platform or another. And GitHub, Microsoft hopes, will be another signal to the community of that position. In that regard, it will be an interesting credibility test for the companies. As previously announced, Nat Friedman, who had been the CEO of Xamarin (another developer-focused startup acquired by Microsoft, in 2016), will be CEO of the company, while GitHub founder and former CEO Chris Wanstrath will become a Microsoft technical fellow to work on strategic software initiatives. (Wanstrath had come back to his CEO role after his co-founder Tom Preston-Werner resigned following a harassment investigation in 2014.) Friedman, in a short note, said that he will be taking over on Monday, and he also repeated what Microsoft said at the time of the deal: GitHub will be run as an independent platform and business. This is a key point because there has been a lot of developer backlash over the deal, with many asking if GitHub would become partial or focused more around Microsoft-based projects. “We will always support developers in their choice of any language, license, tool, platform, or cloud,” he writes, noting that there will be more tools to come. “We will continue to build tasteful, snappy, polished tools that developers love,” he added. One of those, he noted, will be further development and investment in Paper Cuts, a project it launched in August that it hopes will help address some of the gripes that its developer-users might have with how GitHub works that the company itself hadn’t been planning to address in bigger product upgrades. The idea here is that GitHub can either help find workarounds, or this will become a feedback forum of its own to help figure out what it should be upgrading next on the site. Of course, the need to remain neutral is not just to keep hold of its 31 million developers (up by 3 million since the deal was first announced), but to keep them from jumping to GitHub competitors, which include GitLab and Bitbucket.

In ‘Fortnite’ Monopoly, Tilted Towers is the new Boardwalk

How do you get Fortnite-obsessed kids to play an old-school board game? By putting Fortnite in the board game, of course. Epic and Hasbro have revealed a Fortnite version of Monopoly that replaces the usual property trading with elements from the b...

Streaming services in talks to release movies in IMAX theaters

Outside of Netflix's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon sequel, streaming movies haven't really had a chance to shine on IMAX screens. They might make a regular appearance before long, though. IMAX chief Richard Gelfond told investors that his company...

Wirecutter’s best deals: HIFiMan’s HE400i headphones drop to $180

This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. Read their continuously updated list of deals here. Also, stay...

Tortuga Logic raises $2 million to build chip-level security systems

Tortuga Logic has raised $2 million in seed funding from Eclipse Ventures to help in their effort to maintain chip-level system security. Based in Palo Alto, the company plans to use the cash to build products that will find “lurking vulnerabilities” on computer hardware. The founders, Dr. Jason Oberg, Dr. Jonathan Valamehr, Professor Ryan Kastner of UC San Diego, and Professor… Read More

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