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Jada Pinkett Smith Was Right To Use Shame As A Parenting Tool


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Jada Pinkett Smith Was Right To Use Shame As A Parenting Tool

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Jada Pinkett Smith said that she used shame as a parenting tool on her daughter, Willow Smith. Was she wrong in doing so? Published: September 29, 2020 at UTC 4:45 PM Jada Pinkett-Smith is not a bad mother just because she lets her children know when they’re wrong. | Source: Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock.comJada Pinkett Smith recently said she used shame as a parenting tool on her daughter, Willow Smith.She seemed almost embarrassed to admit this.But she shouldn’t be — she was right to use shame as a tool, and science backs her up.Jada Pinkett Smith recently revealed she used shame as a parenting tool on her daughter, Willow Smith.The actress and “Red Table Talk” host seemed almost embarrassed to admit it.But since it isn’t “popular” amongst the new wave crowd, science proves that using shame as a tool — provided it’s used correctly — is actually much more effective than previously believed.Jada Pinkett Smith Gave An ExplanationOn a recent episode of her hit Facebook Watch talk show, “Red Table Talk,” Jada Pinkett Smith admitted that she used shame as a parenting tool on her daughter, Willow Smith. While it’s unclear whether she used the same tool on her son, Jaden, what’s clear is that she seemed embarrassed to have used the device on her daughter.I’m like, ‘Oh my god.’ I’m like, ‘I never even saw it that way.’ But I did really try, especially in raising Willow, in trying not to put shame around her social development. You know, trying to raise a young woman and what a young woman goes through, but not recognizing how detrimental that is. Using shame as a parenting tool.This is not the first time she’s beaten herself up over her parenting skills. Check out the video below.While Smith’s guest, Brene Brown, said that shame shouldn’t be used as a parenting tool, other scientific studies suggest that it’s quite effective when used properly.The Key Word Is “Properly”One of the things that’s important to remember is that shame needs to be used properly for it to be effective. While Jada Pinkett Smith suggests that she didn’t use it properly on her daughter, April Masini indicates a proper way to use it.Shame is the feeling you get when you’ve done something wrong, and you think you should have known better. It’s derivative of guilt, and there is a place for it in parenting.The key is to make sure the child understands that what s/he did was wrong, not that the child is fundamentally wrong. “Good people sometimes do bad things,” in other words, and the key is to strive to be better.Sure, the “love and light” and toxic positivity crowd will lead you to believe that it’s “totes not okay.” They’re wrong. Raising children with no boundaries and structure — with no sense of right or wrong — leads to the epidemic of spoiled rotten brats that we’re seeing today.Jada Pinkett Smith isn’t the perfect mother, but she’s a good one. | Source: TwitterBy no means is Jada Pinkett Smith the perfect mother. No woman is. But she’s a good mother, and she should never be made to feel otherwise.Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of CCN.com.Aaron Weaver edited this article for CCN.com. If you see a breach of our Code of Ethics or find a factual, spelling, or grammar error, please contact us.This article was written by: Bernadette Giacomazzo Bernadette Giacomazzo is an editor, writer, and photographer whose work has appeared in Teen Vogue, People, Us Weekly, The Source, XXL, HipHopDX, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Post, BET.com, and more. She is also the author of The Uprising series and is the CEO of the acclaimed G-Force Marketing & Publicity firm, which has been featured in The Hollywood Reporter and has scored film, television, radio, and print placements for celebrity clientele worldwide. Reach her via email. Visit her website here, her MuckRack profile here, or her LinkedIn profile here.* All comments must be approved by staff before appearing on CCN.com. We do not allow bad language, hate speech, nor verbal attacks on staff or other commentators. Some comments may be edited for clarification or if they are in breach of our comment policy. If you wish to delete your comment or data, please contact us. Inline FeedbacksView all comments September 10, 2020 No Comments August 18, 2020 No Comments May 15, 2020 No Comments September 29, 2020 1 Comment September 29, 2020 No Comments September 29, 2020 4 Comments September 29, 2020 No Comments September 29, 2020 No Comments September 29, 2020 2 Comments CCN.com is a global news site with journalists in the U.S., UK, Europe, and Asia. We cover financial markets, business, politics, showbiz, sports, and gaming. Opinionated articles are clearly marked with “Op-Ed.”Editorial TeamChief Editor: Samburaj Das – [email protected] Editor: Aaron Weaver – [email protected] Editor: Sam Bourgi – [email protected] and Founder: Jonas Borchgrevink [email protected] and Recruiting: Pamela Meropiali – [email protected] Manager: Pankaj Upadhyay – [email protected]© 2020 Copyright: Hawkfish AS. All Rights Reserved. Address: Drengsrudhagen 6, 1385, Asker, Norway. Regional offices: U.S., Canada, and India.

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